Guide To Communicating Carbon Pricing

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Description
This training provides specific communication recommendations around carbon pricing policy based on the main findings and recommendations in the Guide to Communicating Carbon Pricing report.
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TOC and Guide Section
 
Background & Key Findings
  • The Guide to Communicating Carbon Pricing report was prepared by the Partnership for Market Readiness & Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition in 2018 and can help volunteers improve our communications around carbon pricing policy based on the main findings and recommendations. Stakeholder and public support are critical for an enduring and robust carbon pricing policy. How jurisdictions communicate their carbon pricing policy plays a key role in creating and maintaining that support. Drawing on case studies, research and best practice, the report provides guidance on designing and implementing effective carbon pricing communications strategies.


Key Findings 

  • Narratives based on values, identity 
  • Convey trust and fairness 
  • Address salient concerns
  • Possibly through the visible use of revenues 
  • Evidence-based on research and testing
  • Iterative communication design from the outset and at all stages
  • Good communications need good policy
Improving The Standard Narrative
The Standard Narrative
  • Climate change is a dangerous, costly future threat
  • So we need to put a “price on carbon”
  • This is how carbon pricing works
  • A small cost now averts larger costs in the future
  • And, it brings us other benefits

 

A Better Narrative
  • You know me and trust me 
  • We are going to provide something great 
  • And it wont be paid out of your income taxes or business profits 
  • But by a small additional charge on pollution 
  • A fair way to put things in balance- by providing the things that people want

Fair/Unfair:

Carbon pricing is a fair way to share responsibility for the carbon pollution that causes climate change and to reward the companies that are most efficient and pollute the least. It's not fair that heavy energy users can dump their carbon pollution in the air we all breathe. Polluters should be held accountable and should pay for the pollution that they force all of us to live with.

The importance of trusted communicators

  • Ask: who are the trusted communicators?
  • A process for recruiting trusted communicators
  • Supporting and enabling broad based engagement
Challenges To Communicating

1. Whether or not to proactively communicate carbon pricing

Factors to consider

  • High-profile, independent legislation required?
  • Is significant opposition likely?
  • Carbon pricing associated with specific political party?
  • Relevance of public opinion on policymaking

Reasons for proactive communication

  • Set tone of the debate, control messaging 
  • Necessary if visibility is important for  effectiveness

Concerns with proactive communications 

  • Communication may draw critical attention
  • Level of trust in government affects trust public places in government explanations

2. Whether or not to focus on climate change

Factors to consider

  • Climate change = challenge and opportunity 
  • Climate change as current concern 
  • Co-benefits: energy transition, clean air, etc.

High prominence to climate change

  • Testing of public concern and understanding of the issue
  • Other, more prominent issues (e.g.: air pollution)?
  • Level of (political) polarization on the issue

Low prominence to climate change 

  • Other (more prominent) issues e.g. air pollution, green economy
  • Energy transition and technological transformation

 

Ground Rules for Effective Conversations
  1. Respect 
  2. Hold your own truth
  3. Ask and listen

Four Parts of Conversation:

  1. Opening
  2. Validate- you are right
  3.  State your position-”I think”
  4. Ask a question. “What do you think”
    • Ask about personal experiences
    • Reflect what you hear, show that you’ve heard
    • Don’t interrupt
    • Learn from them
    • Have an exchange and learn from one another
    • Ask for more information

To find out more - go to Climate Outreach's How to Have A Climate Conversation page #TalkingClimate to watch a more in-depth webinar, download the slides and share your experiences on Twitter using the #TalkingClimate hashtag. People who register will receive regular updates about the project as well as a handbook on how to have effective climate change conversations that will summarize the findings from the project. This handbook will be ready at the end of November 2019.

Length
Press play to start the video (46m 58s)
https://vimeo.com/showcase/6251824
Video Outline
To skip ahead to a specific section go to the time indicated in parenthesis.

Intro & Agenda
(from beginning)

Background & Key Findings
(2:53)

Improving The Standard Narrative
(16:41)

Challenges To Communicating
(27:47)

Energy Innovation Act Applications
(33:58)

Ground Rules for Effective Conversations
(42:13)
 

Instructor(s)
  • George Marshall
  • Tom Erb
Downloads

Download PowerPoint or Google Slides presentation.

Download the video.

 
Audio length
Press play to start the audio (45m 57s)
Audio embed code
Audio Outline

To skip ahead to a specific section go to the time indicated in parenthesis.

Intro & Agenda
(from beginning)

Background & Key Findings
(2:53)

Improving The Standard Narrative
(16:41)

Challenges To Communicating
(27:47)

Energy Innovation Act Applications
(33:58)

Ground Rules for Effective Conversations
(42:13)

Instructor(s)
  • George Marshall
  • Tom Erb
To Print
Instructions for printing this page on Community.
Category
Training
Topics
Communicating with Others
Format
Audio / Video, Presentation
Training Resources